Product articles SQL Clone Development and Testing with Clones

Unwrapping, Unboxing and Installing SQL Clone

If you are evaluating a tool such as a text editor or spreadsheet, it is easy: you just install it, you run it, you decide whether you need it. Job done. However, a similar 'unboxing' or 'unwrapping' of SQL Clone, and installing across a network, is not so quick and easy. Phil Factor's solution is to install and run a complete installation of SQL Clone on a single box. This allows you to try everything out, creating images and deploying clones, while isolated from the network. It can then be extended across a network, subsequently, when it's been fully tested. Read more

Deploying and Reverting Clones for Database Development and Testing

It can be quite a shock for developers to realize they can make radical changes to the data or schema, while testing, safe in the knowledge that it will take them only a few seconds to revert the database to its original state. Phil Factor demonstrates how it's done, using SQL Clone and PowerShell. It means you easily run a series of rapid-fire database tests (run a test, reset the clone back to how it was, run another test, and so on). Read more

How to create and refresh development and test databases automatically, using SQL Clone and SQL Toolbelt

Phil Factor shows how a set of Redgate tools can be used together, via PowerShell, to build a database from object-level source, stock it with data, document it, and then provision any number of test and development servers. Before tearing down and rebuilding a database to a new version, we take care to save any DDL changes made to the existing copy. Read more

Backup and restore of a SQL Clone

What if you now do development work on a clone, but you to continue working on you own local clone while ‘disconnected’, such as when travelling? One simple option if the original database contains no private data, or the image has been masked, is to performance a normal backup and restore operations the clone, although you'll now be working with a normal, full-sized database. Read more