Grant Fritchey

Grant Fritchey is a Data Platform MVP with over 30 years' experience in IT, including time spent in support and development. He has worked with SQL Server since 6.0 back in 1995. He has also developed in VB, VB.NET, C#, and Java. Grant has written books for Apress and Simple-Talk. Grant presents at conferences and user groups, large and small, all over the world. Grant volunteers for PASS and is on the Board of Directors as the Immediate Past President. He joined Redgate Software as a product advocate January 2011.

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27 April 2011
27 April 2011

It’s 3AM and I’m on call

If you are part of a team that is required to ensure that an application stays running at all hours, then you're likely to experience that 3AM-callout feeling. Grant knows all too well what is required, and gives hard-won advice on the best way of keeping on top of the task of keeping the IT services running, no matter what time of day the problems occur.… Read more
25 April 2011
25 April 2011

SQL Azure Deployments

Over on ScaryDBA.com I posted about the new Data-Tier Application (DAC) and DAC packages (DAC pac) this morning. You might be thinking, “Oh, now he’s on the Red Gate blog he’s going to rip it apart.” And you’d be wrong. I want to work from the premise that Microsoft is completely on to something. Not … Read more
19 April 2011
19 April 2011

SQL Azure Backup

Have some important information stored out there on the cloud? Want a way to get a copy of it down to your local machine? Here you go. A nice neat little backup tool from Red Gate, SQL Azure Backup. Let me talk about this a bit. First off, you need to know, you will pay … Read more
08 April 2011
08 April 2011

Learning Stuff

Yeah, I work for Red Gate. For some reason people seem to think that means I know everything there is to know about all their products. Let me break the news, I don’t. But I’m learning. My previous employer had me do an evaluation of SQL Hyperbac and I fell in love. But we didn’t … Read more
07 April 2011
07 April 2011

Performing DBCC Checks Using SQL Virtual Restore

Ever restored a corrupted database from the backup, only to find that the backups are corrupted too - All the backups? Sure it can happen and it isn't nice when it does. To check that a database backup is internally consistent you have to use DBCC CheckDB. On a huge highly-loaded live system? Grant Fritchey has, as usual, a practical solution.… Read more
11 March 2011
11 March 2011

Restoring Databases

I like the way Mike Walsh phrased it: You’re Only As Good as Your Ability To Restore. Ain’t it the truth. You may be taking backups, incrementals, and log backups of your databases. You may have DBCC in place, and all that fun stuff. But if you haven’t restored the database, what do you have? … Read more
10 March 2011
10 March 2011

Azure

I’ve been tasked to learn SQL Azure, as well as test all the Red Gate products on it. My one, BIG, fear has been that I’ll receive some mongo bill in the mail because I’ve exceeded the MSDN testing limit. I know people that have had that problem. I’ve been trying to keep an eye … Read more
09 March 2011
09 March 2011

I’m Seeing Red

Hello World! My move into the world of Red Gate is more and more complete with my shiny, new, red, blog. The goal of this blog is not to compete with, or replace, my blog over at ScaryDBA. Instead, this blog is where I can share things I find about Red Gate products and services. … Read more
12 November 2009
12 November 2009

Controlling Execution Plans with Hints

The Query Optimizer gets it right most of the time, but occasionally it chooses a plan that isn't the best possible. You can give the Query Optimiser a better idea by using Table, Join and Query hints. These come with a risk: Any choices you force on the Optimizer by using hints can turn out to be entirely wrong as the database changes with the addition of data over time. Grant Fritchey, in a chapter from his highly acclaimed book, explains further. … Read more
11 May 2008
11 May 2008

Execution Plan Basics

Every day, out in the various discussion boards devoted to Microsoft SQL Server, the same types of questions come up again and again: Why is this query running slow? Is my index getting used? Why isn't my index getting used? Why does this query run faster than this query?. The correct response is probably different in each case, but in order to arrive at the answer you have to ask the same return question in each case: have you looked at the execution plan? … Read more