ORACLENERD T-Shirts

Recently I was asked to create some merchandise that fell outside of my norm. Specifically, I was asked to create a onesie, or piece baby outfit. I tried using my normal method of creating a simple png (pixel) graphic in gimp, however, when I tried to add that to something other than a regular old t-shirt, the application didn’t give… Continue Reading →

Recently I was asked to create some merchandise that fell outside of my norm.

Specifically, I was asked to create a onesie, or piece baby outfit. I tried using my normal method of creating a simple png (pixel) graphic in gimp, however, when I tried to add that to something other than a regular old t-shirt, the application didn’t give me the option to do so. Apparently I needed to use vector graphics. I should have known this, since I’m a design genius and all that.

I thought I could continue to use gimp and simply save the file as an encapsulated post script and upload it. Spreadshirt has a semi-automated system that, apparently, attempts to open the file. If it can’t, it sends it off for review by their staff. Sometime in the next day or 2, I get an email telling me whether it has passed or not. None of my 3 attempts passed. In my rejection notice, they said I could send them the file directly and ask what’s wrong. That’s when I got a nice primer on vector vs. pixel graphics. I needed to use a tool like Corel Draw, Illustrator or Inkscape. I chose Inkscape, it was free and runs on Linux. Yay for me. Yay for OSS.

You can see my first 2 attempts at using vector graphics on my blog.